Cookware - US - June 2017


#1170680

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Mintel

$ 3995

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Cookware sales have remained slow amid high household penetration, yet steady growth is likely attributed to consumers’ generally positive attitudes toward cooking and baking at home. While adults find health and creative benefits to the process, there is interest in furthering their skills in the kitchen and expanding their inventory pointing to market growth potential.

Table of Content

OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Universal household penetration leads to slow market growth
Figure 1: Cookware, bakeware, cutlery ownership, April 2016-17
Shifts in cooking and baking habits present challenges
Figure 2: Cooking and baking frequency, April 2016-17
Convenience, selection drive retailer selection
Figure 3: Importance of selection, convenience, and value-added experiences when selecting a retailer, by age, April 2017
The opportunities
Tap into younger adults interest in improving skills, growing inventory
Figure 4: Select attitudes and behaviors toward cooking and baking, by age, April 2017
Experiential retail piques consumer interest
Figure 5: Interest in value-added retailer experiences, April 2017
Emphasize health aspects to reach broad audience
Figure 6: Perceptions of cooking at home being healthy, by gender, age, April 2017
What it means

THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Cookware sees modest growth, reaching $5.1 billion in 2017
Subscription services, health, and hygge impact cooking
Dining out spend encroaches on eating in, cost of groceries falling

MARKET SIZE AND FORECAST
Cookware sales see slow, but stable growth
Figure 7: Total US sales and fan chart forecast of cookware market, at current prices, 2012-22
Figure 8: Total US retail sales and forecast of cookware, at current prices, 2012-22

MARKET BREAKDOWN
Nonstick cookware accounts for nearly one third of category, sees growth
Figure 9: Total US retail sales of cookware, by segment share, 2017
Figure 10: Total US retail sales of cookware, by segment, at current prices, 2015 and 2017
Sales mainly occur within supercenters, warehouse clubs
Figure 11: Total US retail sales of cookware, by channel, at current prices, 2015 and 2017

MARKET PERSPECTIVE
Subscription services revive cooking enthusiasm
Space conscious living is a growing trend
Figure 12: Repertoire of cookware ownership, by living location, April 2017
Americans search for hygge could end in the kitchen

MARKET FACTORS
Americans pursue health while obesity rates continue to rise
Presence of children, income impacts ownership, cooking habits
Figure 13: Households, by presence of related children, 2006-16
At-home and out-of-home spending on food continues to rise
Figure 14: Food sales, at home and away from home, January 2003-June 2016
Groceries becoming more affordable
Figure 15: Consumer price index, food at home, seasonally adjusted, August 2015-16

KEY PLAYERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Ceramic gaining popularity, social media generates enthusiasm
Department stores lack relevance for category shoppers
Brands get patriotic, commit to health, and get smarter

WHAT’S WORKING?
Garden-to-table
Ceramic pans tackle all cooking and baking needs
In-store shopping experience remains important
Social media encourages cooking and baking

WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Department stores see softness amid current retail climate
A focus on convenience and color could benefit cutlery
Anodized aluminum cookware, metal bakeware continue to struggle
Figure 16: Total US retail sales of anodized aluminum cookware and metal bakeware, at current prices, 2015 and 2017

WHAT’S NEXT?
2017 design trends attract shoppers attention
Le Creuset expands from iconic Dutch ovens
Brands partner for commitment to health
Made in the USA
Cook smarter, not harder
Figure 17: Hestan Cue
Figure 18: Google Home now provides step-by-step recipe instructions, April 26, 2017

THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Universal household penetration of cookware
Bakeware and cutlery ownership levels hold steady
Cooking and baking frequency remains relatively unchanged
Mass channels most shopped for category purchases
Convenience, wide assortment key for retailers
The good outweighs the bad when cooking and baking at home

COOKWARE OWNERSHIP
Cookware ownership nearly universal
Figure 19: Cookware ownership, April 2016-17
Older adults, parents own wider range of cookware
Figure 20: Ownership of select cookware, by age, parental status, April 2017
Figure 21: Repertoire of cookware ownership, by demographics, April 2017
Multicultural adults seek ethnic cookware
Figure 22: Ownership of select cookware, by race and Hispanic origin, April 2017
Income, home ownership tied to cookware ownership
Figure 23: Ownership of select cookware, by household income, primary residence, April 2017
Figure 24: Repertoire of cookware ownership, by household income, primary residence, April 2017

BAKEWARE AND CUTLERY OWNERSHIP
Ownership holds steady
Bakeware
Cutlery
Figure 25: Bakeware and cutlery ownership, April 2016-17
Bakeware, cutlery ownership skews toward older adults, non-Hispanics
Figure 26: Bakeware ownership, by age, Hispanic origin, April 2017
Figure 27: Cutlery ownership, by age, Hispanic origin, April 2017
Residency, income impact bakeware, cutlery ownership
Figure 28: Select bakeware and cutlery ownership, by household income, primary residence, April 2017

COOKING AND BAKING FREQUENCY
Adults becoming slightly less involved with cooking and baking
Figure 29: Cooking and baking frequency, April 2016-17
Men becoming more engaged in the kitchen
Figure 30: Cooking frequency, by gender, April 2017
Adults aged 18-44 increasing their at-home cooking and baking
Figure 31: Cooking and baking frequency, by age, April 2017
Kids influence cooking and baking frequency
Figure 32: Cooking and baking frequency, by parental status, April 2017
Renters, urban dwellers becoming increasingly present in kitchen
Figure 33: Cooking and baking more than a year ago, by primary residence, living location, April 2017

RETAILERS SHOPPED
Mass merchandisers the top channel, regardless of segment
Online reaches shoppers, faces challenges
Figure 34: Retailers shopped, by segment, April 2017
Regardless of income, mass merchandisers are primary shopping destination
Figure 35: Retailers shopped (any segment – Net), by household income, April 2017
Young adults shop low price, convenient retailers
Figure 36: Select retailers shopped for cookware and cutlery, by age, April 2017
Figure 37: Select retailers shopped, by segment, by race and Hispanic origin, April 2017

RETAILER SELECTION FACTORS
Selection and convenience hold the most importance
Enhanced retailing piques interest
Figure 38: Retailer selection factors, April 2017
Selection, convenience, and assortment could reach a majority
Figure 39: TURF Analysis – Retailer selection factors, April 2017
TURF Methodology
Retailers can differentiate on experiences to reach younger adults, parents
Figure 40: Retailer selection factors, by age, parental status, April 2017
Value-added retail experiences could reach multicultural adults
Figure 41: Select retailer selection factors, by race and Hispanic origin, April 2017

COOKING AND BAKING ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIORS
Benefits of cooking and baking at home outweigh negatives
Figure 42: Cooking and baking attitudes and behaviors, April 2017
Gender, lifestage impact attitudes toward cooking
Figure 43: Select cooking and baking attitudes and behaviors, by gender and age, parental status, April 2017
Space can be an issue for Hispanic adults
Figure 44: Select attitudes and behaviors about cookware storage and display, by Hispanic origin, April 2017

APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Sales data
Fan chart forecast
Consumer survey data
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations

APPENDIX – THE MARKET
Figure 45: Total US retail sales and forecast of cookware, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2012-22
Market Breakdown
Figure 46: Total US retail sales and forecast of cookware, by segment, at current prices, 2012-22
Figure 47: Total US retail sales of cookware, by segment, at current prices, 2015 and 2017
Figure 48: Total US retail sales and forecast of nonstick cookware, at current prices, 2012-22
Figure 49: Total US retail sales and forecast of stainless steel cookware, at current prices, 2012-22
Figure 50: Total US retail sales and forecast of anodized aluminum cookware, at current prices, 2012-22
Figure 51: Total US retail sales and forecast of other cookware*, at current prices, 2012-22
Figure 52: Total US retail sales and forecast of metal bakeware, at current prices, 2012-22
Figure 53: Total US retail sales and forecast of cutlery, at current prices, 2012-22
Retail channels
Figure 54: Total US retail sales of cookware, by channel, at current prices, 2012-17
Figure 55: Total US retail sales of cookware, by channel, at current prices, 2015 and 2017
Market factors
Figure 56: Median household income, by race/Hispanic origin of householder, in inflation-adjusted dollars, 2005-15

APPENDIX – THE CONSUMER
Figure 57: Retailers shopped (net – Any segment), April 2017
Figure 58: Social media usage, March 2017

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