Social Networking - Ireland - May 2017


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Irish consumers are warier of fake news compared to 12 months ago. This indicates that they are becoming increasingly sceptical of content posted to social networks and they think these platforms need to do more to prevent fake news from spreading. Improving detection and removal processes will help social networks to reduce the amount of fake news circulating on their platforms and thus maintain their credibility among consumers as a source of news.

Table of Content

OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Issues covered in this Report

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Market factors
RoI firms have second-highest usage of social media in EU
Social networking popular, but not done in isolation
Advertising expenditure on social networks grows significantly in RoI during 2016
Social networks affected by fake news
Companies, brands and innovations
The consumer
Facebook is Irish consumers’ preferred social network
Figure 1: Types of social networks that consumers log on to regularly (ie log on at least once per week), NI and RoI, April 2017
YouTube dominates media network usage
Figure 2: Types of media networks that consumers log on to regularly (ie log on at least once per week), NI and RoI, April 2017
Facebook-owned platforms the most popular messenger apps
Figure 3: Types of messenger apps that consumers log on to regularly (ie log on at least once per week), NI and RoI, April 2017
Humorous content being ‘liked’ and shared by Irish consumers
Figure 4: Types of content consumers share (eg via private messages, on your profile) on social and media networks most often, NI and RoI, April 2017
Figure 5: Types of content consumers ‘like’ (eg via private messages, on your profile) on social and media networks most often, NI and RoI, April 2017
Irish consumers warier of fake news
Figure 6: How consumers interact with social and media networks, NI and RoI, April 2017
Consumers want social networks to do more to prevent spread of fake news
Figure 7: Agreement with statements relating to social and media networks, NI and RoI, April 2017
What we think

THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
RoI firms among the highest users of social and media networks
NI consumers likely using social networks during other activities
Spending on social media advertising in RoI continues to grow
Fake news is a significant issue for social and media networks

MARKET DRIVERS
Using social media platforms popular among NI consumers
Figure 8: Activities carried out online by internet users, NI, August 2016
Figure 9: Average time spent on activities per day, NI, August 2016
Usage of social media by RoI firms second highest in the EU in 2016
Figure 10: Enterprise usage of social media in selected European Union countries, 2016
Social media spending sees significant growth in RoI
Figure 11: Year-on-year growth rates for digital advertising formats, RoI, 2015-16
Snapchat goes public
Twitter considering a subscription service
YouTube affected by advertising boycott
Fake news is a real issue for social networks
Figure 12: Fake news traffic, global, January 2017

MARKET IN CONTEXT
Case study: An Post
Background
How it uses online social networks
Recent social networking activity
Case study: ASOS
Background
How it uses online social networks
Recent social networking activity
Case study: Dale Farm
Background
How it uses online social networks
Recent social networking activity
Case study: SuperValu
Background
How it uses online social networks
Recent social networking activity
Case study: University of Limerick
Background
How it uses online social networks
Recent social networking activity

COMPANIES AND BRANDS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Instagram introduces shopping tags
Facebook developing hardware
Snap Inc. shifts from technology to cameras
Pinterest ‘Shop the Look’ offers potential

COMPETITIVE STRATEGIES – KEY PLAYERS
Ello
Key facts
User facilities
Recent developments
Facebook (including WhatsApp and Instagram)
Key facts
User facilities
Recent developments
Flickr
Key facts
User facilities
Recent developments
Google (Google+ and YouTube)
Key facts
User facilities
Recent developments
LinkedIn
Key facts
User facilities
Recent developments
Pinterest
Key facts
User facilities
Recent developments
Reddit
Key facts
User facilities
Recent developments
Snapchat
Key facts
User facilities
Recent developments
Twitter
Key facts
User facilities
Recent developments

THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Facebook is the most popular social networking site in Ireland
Irish consumers regularly logging on to YouTube
Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp the messaging apps of choice
Irish consumers ‘liking’ and sharing humorous content
Fake news a key concern for Irish consumers

USAGE OF SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES
Facebook the dominant social network
Figure 13: Types of social networks that consumers log on to regularly (ie log on at least once per week), NI and RoI, April 2017
Facebook most popular among young consumers
Figure 14: Consumers who log on to Facebook regularly (ie log on at least once per week), by age, NI and RoI, April 2017
Students and working consumers using Google+
Figure 15: Consumers who log on to Google+ regularly (ie log on at least once per week), by social class, NI and RoI, April 2017
Twitter preferred by young Millennials
Figure 16: Consumers who log on to Twitter regularly (ie log on at least once per week), by age, NI and RoI, April 2017

USAGE OF MEDIA NETWORKING SITES
Irish consumers regularly use YouTube
Figure 17: Types of media networks that consumers log on to regularly (ie log on at least once per week), NI and RoI, April 2017
YouTube popular among students
Figure 18: Consumers who log on to YouTube regularly (ie log on at least once per week), by work status, NI and RoI, April 2017
Gender differences in media network usage
Figure 19: Types of media networks that consumers log on to regularly (ie log on at least once per week), by gender, NI, April 2017
Figure 20: Types of media networks that consumers log on to regularly (ie log on at least once per week), by gender, RoI, April 2017

USAGE OF MESSENGER APPS
Facebook-owned platforms dominate messaging services
Figure 21: Types of messenger apps that consumers log on to regularly (ie log on at least once per week), NI and RoI, April 2017
Facebook Messenger popular among Millennials
Figure 22: Consumers who log on to Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp regularly (ie log on at least once per week), by age, NI, April 2017
Figure 23: Consumers who log on to Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp regularly (ie log on at least once per week), by age, RoI, April 2017
Irish women the main Snapchatters
Figure 24: Consumers who log on to Snapchat regularly (ie log on at least once per week), by gender, NI and RoI, April 2017

TYPE OF CONTENT SHARED AND LIKED ON SOCIAL AND MEDIA NETWORKS
Humorous content on social networks popular among consumers
Figure 25: Types of content consumers share (eg via private messages, on your profile) on social and media networks most often, NI and RoI, April 2017
Irish women most likely to share humorous content
Figure 26: Consumers who have shared comedy/humorous content on social and media networks, by gender, NI and RoI, April 2017
‘Sharenting’ popular among Irish consumers
Figure 27: Consumers who have shared photos of themselves, friends and family on social and media networks, by presence of children in the household, NI and RoI, April 2017
Consumers ‘like’ content of a personal nature
Figure 28: Types of content consumers ‘like’ (eg via private messages, on your profile) on social and media networks most often, NI and RoI, April 2017
16-24-year-olds do the most ‘liking’ of statuses and photos of friends or family
Figure 29: Consumers who have ‘liked’ a friend’s or family member’s status, profile and photos on social and media networks, by age, NI and RoI, April 2017
Holiday photos, articles and videos ‘liked’ by younger consumers
Figure 30: Consumers who have ‘liked’ holiday photos, articles and videos on social and media networks, by age, NI and RoI, April 2017

INTERACTION WITH SOCIAL AND MEDIA NETWORKS
Irish consumers warier of fake news
Figure 31: How consumers interact with social and media networks, NI and RoI, April 2017
Young consumers most wary of fake news on social media
Figure 32: Consumers who are warier of fake news posts on social media now compared to 12 months ago, by age, NI and RoI, April 2017
Women sharing and ‘liking’ company statuses because of competitions
Figure 33: Consumers who have 'liked' and/or shared a brand/company status on social/media networking sites because of a promotion/competition, by gender and age, NI and RoI, April 2017
Parents more aware of ‘trolling’
Figure 34: Consumers who are more aware of 'trolls'/cyberbullies than they were 12 months ago, by presence of children in the household, NI and RoI, April 2017

ATTITUDES TOWARDS SOCIAL AND MEDIA NETWORKS
Consumers think social networks need to do more to tackle fake news
Figure 35: Agreement with statements relating to social and media networks, NI and RoI, April 2017
Millennials think social networks need to do more to prevent spread of fake news
Figure 36: Agreement with the statement ‘Social networks need to do more to prevent fake news from spreading (ie issuing a fine/ ban to fake news posters)’, by age, NI and RoI, April 2017
Raising issues on social media more effective for younger consumers
Figure 37: Agreement with the statement ‘Raising issues with a company via social media is more effective than contacting them directly (ie by phone)’, by age, NI and RoI, April 2017
Married consumers think social networks are a distraction from ‘real life’
Figure 38: Agreement with the statement ‘I am worried that social/media networks are a distraction from 'real life' (eg disrupting work/school/family life)’, by marital status, NI and RoI, April 2017

APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES, ABBREVIATIONS AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION
Data sources
Generational cohort definitions
Abbreviations

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