Marketing to Singles - China - June 2015


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Mintel

$ 3990

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Single people’s happiness is largely dependent upon how well they are able to support their life financially to fulfil their needs and interests. While there is great business potential lying in satisfying the advanced needs of the ‘Live in the moment singles’ and the rising ‘Independent females”, there also lies opportunities for brands to pay attention to the basic needs of the less wealthy and more stressed single people – males in particular.
Table of Content

Introduction

Definition
Methodology
Abbreviations

Executive Summary

Overview of single consumers and their lifestyles
Figure 1: Population of single people (unmarried, widowed and divorced) aged 20 and over, China 2004-13
The happy and non-happy singles
Figure 2: Consumers segmentation based on their attitude towards life, March 2015
Figure 3: Consumer attitudes towards single life - % of “agree strongly” or “agree somewhat”, by psychographic group, March 2015
Single people find their pride in freedom and independence
Figure 4: Perceived advantages of being single, March 2015
A happy romance is more desirable than simply getting married
Figure 5: Most desired achievements, March 2015
However, the singles hate to be pushed by others
Figure 6: Annoyances of being single, March 2015
More helping hands and caring for single males
What we think

Issues and Insights

Are single people happy or not?
The facts
The implications
Are singles eager to find a partner?
The facts
The implications
The “stressed single males” present marketing opportunities
The facts
The implications
Figure 7: Etude House’s hand cream packaging featuring mood lifting mood lifting messages, South Korea, 2013
Decoding the “independent single females”
The facts
The implications

Trend Application

The Power of One
Figure 8: Example of convenient stores (FamilyMart) offering entertainment devices on its in-store dining table, Shanghai, 2015
The Unfair Sex
Click and Connect

Overview of Single Consumers in China

Key points
Over 230 million singles over 20
Figure 9: Marital status among people aged over 20, China, 2013
Single population is continuously expanding
Figure 10: Percentage of single people amongst total population over 20, China, 2013
Sense of freedom is the source of happiness for single consumers
Figure 11: Selected attitudes towards life, by relationship status, March 2015
Singles are as conscious in personal finance management
Figure 12: Selected attitudes towards spending and future plans, by relationship status, March 2015

Why Do People Enjoy Being Single?

Key points
Single people see themselves being free and independent
Figure 13: Perceived advantages of being single, March 2015
Females, aged 25-39, high earners and those living in tier one cities are more likely to enjoy being single
Figure 14: Average number of perceived advantages of being single, by demographics, March 2015
Females hold a more positive attitude towards being single than males do
Figure 15: Perceived advantages of being single, by gender, March 2015
Figure 16: Example of Baileys’ marketing communications on its Irish cream liqueur, China, 2015
Figure 17: Example of Baileys’ marketing communications on its Irish cream liqueur, China, 2015
The over 25s see more benefits from being single
Figure 18: Perceived advantages of being single, by age, March 2015
The more you earn, the more you enjoy singlehood
Figure 19: Perceived advantages of being single, by monthly personal income, March 2015

What Annoys Single People the Most?

Key points
Pressure from others annoys them more than the difficulty in finding a partner
Figure 20: Annoyances of being single, March 2015
Figure 21: Consumers who are concerned about the pressure from friends/family to find a partner/get married, by demographics, March 2015
The majority still look forward to finding a partner
Figure 22: Consumers who are concerned about the difficulty in finding a partner as they get older, by demographics, March 2015
Security of life in the future still exists
Figure 23: Consumers who are concerned “may miss the best childbearing age as getting older”, by age, March 2015
High earners in tier one cities have other concerns
Figure 24: Average number of concerns about being single chosen, by demographics, March 2015
Emotional support and a helping hand can appeal to high earners
Figure 25: Selected annoyances of being single, by income, March 2015

Single People’s Aspirations in Life

Key points
Career achievements, a happy romance and better financial situation are most desired
Figure 26: Most desired achievements, March 2015
Travelling is also on top of the mind of the high earning singles
Figure 27: Consumers who chose “to travel to more unknown places” amongst the top three desired achievements, by demographics, March 2015
Aspirations vary by generations:
Figure 28: Most desired achievements, by age, March 2015
The post-90s singles (aged 20-24): develop skills to better themselves
Figure 29: Examples of brands’ marketing communications interpreting future aspirations of the post 90s generation, China, 2015
The post-85s singles: hold on to career and get financially prepared
Figure 30: Examples of brands’ marketing communications interpreting future aspirations of the singles aged 25-29, China, 2015
Singles who are above 30: travel to escape the world they know
Figure 31: Examples of brands’ marketing communications interpreting future aspirations of the singles aged above 30, China, 2015

Single People’s Leisure Life

Key points
Being single does not bar people from regular out-of-home leisure activities
Figure 32: Leisure activities done in the past six months, by relationship status, March 2015
Single people tend to be bounded with their friends during leisure hours
Figure 33: Who to go with in leisure activities, by relationship status, March 2015
Figure 34: Percentage of consumers who have done these leisure activities with their friends in the past six months, by gender, March 2015
Opportunities for targeting the independent singles
Figure 35: Percentage of consumers who have done these leisure activities alone in the past six months, by gender, March 2015
The show business to target wealthy singles
Figure 36: Consumers who have watched live shows / events (eg football games, concerts) in the past six months, by age and income, March 2015

Single People’s Dining Habits

Key points
Singles are more likely to skip breakfast than non-singles
Figure 37: Meal habits, March 2015
Figure 38: Single consumers who are used to skipping breakfast, by demographics, March 2015
How singles have their three meals
Singles do cook for themselves
Figure 39: Ways of having three meals, March 2015
Full service restaurants versus fast food restaurants
Food delivery versus buying takeaway

Different Types of Single Consumers

Key points
Three types of single consumers
Figure 40: Consumers segmentation based on their attitude towards life, March 2015
Figure 41: Consumer attitudes towards life (% of “agree strongly” or “agree somewhat”), by psychographic group, March 2015
Live in the moment singles (单身贵族)
Figure 42: Demographic features of “Live in the moment singles”, by psychographic group, March 2015
Figure 43: Advantages of being single, by psychographic groups, March 2015
Marriage seekers (积极脱单者)
Figure 44: Demographic features of “Marriage seekers”, by psychographic group, March 2015
Figure 45: Ways of doing leisure activities – percentage of consumers who have done the activities with friends over the past six months, by psychographic groups, March 2015
Homebodies (御宅族)
Figure 46: Selected leisure activities done in the past six months, by psychographic groups, March 2015