Attitudes to Advertising - Ireland - October 2015


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Mintel

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With a high level of consumers taking steps to avoid promotional content, advertisers could look to strike a new deal with consumers. Offering incentives to view advertising could encourage them to re-engage with online advertising.

Table of Content

Introduction

Key themes in the report
Market size rationale
Data sources
Definitions
Abbreviations

Executive Summary

The market
Forecast
Figure 1: Indexed estimated advertising revenues, NI and RoI, 2010-20
Market factors
Ad-blocking has financial impact for advertising industry
Social networks are important advertising channels
New vlogger guidelines to provide greater clarity on promoted content
Digital drives overall growth in readership of newspapers in RoI
Smartphone and tablet ownership continues to grow
Companies, brands and innovations
The consumer
Offline advertising more effective in reaching Irish consumers than online methods
Figure 2: How effective consumers find different methods of advertising to be (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), NI and RoI, June 2015
Irish consumers see an increase in volume of advertising
Figure 3: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, NI and RoI, June 2015
Consumers understand that advertising keeps services free
Figure 4: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, NI and RoI, June 2015
What we think

Issues and Insights

What are the main advertising channels used to reach Irish consumers?
The facts
The implications
Are Irish consumers exposed to too much advertising?
The facts
The implications
What are Irish consumers’ attitudes towards advertising?
The facts
The implications
What are the main drivers of the advertising industry in Ireland?
The facts
The implications

Market Overview

Key points
Online ad-blocking a key issue for advertising industry
Figure 5: Global monthly active users (MAUs) of ad-blocking software, January 2013-June 2015
Apple’s iOS 9 update to change the game for mobile advertising
Figure 6: Type of mobile phone device used by consumers (main device only), NI and RoI, March 2015
Facebook and YouTube the most popular social media platforms in Ireland
Figure 7: Social networks used by consumers at least once per week, NI and RoI, March 2015
Figure 8: Media networks used by consumers at least once per week, NI and RoI, March 2015
Social networks launching new services to boost appeal to advertisers
New vlogger guidelines introduced by advertising committee
Print newspapers still popular, but digital readership grows
Figure 9: Readership of print and digital newspapers, RoI, 2012/13-2014/15
Ad agencies returning to newspaper advertising
Figure 10: Advertising revenue generated by newspapers (print and digital), RoI, 2011-14
Mobile device ownership in Ireland continues to grow
Figure 11: Consumers who own, or have access to, mobile technology devices, NI and RoI, July 2014-June 2015
Second screening is a mainstream activity
Amazon and Chrome follow Firefox to block Flash

Market Size and Forecast

Key points
Advertising market continues to grow in 2015
Figure 12: Estimated advertising revenues, IoI, NI and RoI, 2010-20
Recovery in ad spending to be faster in RoI compared to NI
Figure 13: Indexed estimated advertising revenues, NI and RoI, 2010-20
Online the main driver of advertising expenditure
Figure 14: Online advertising spend, RoI, 2009-18
Significant increase in mobile ad spending in 2014…
Figure 15: Breakdown of mobile advertising spend, RoI, 2013 and 2014
though desktop still accounts for majority of digital adspend
Figure 16: Breakdown of desktop advertising spend, RoI, 2013 and 2014

Strengths and Weaknesses

Strengths
Weaknesses

Companies and Innovations

Key points
Examples of innovation
Live-streamed pizza
Snap for ice cream
Print ad chills beer
Company profiles
An Post
Key facts
Recent developments
Carat Ireland
Key facts
Recent developments
Cawley NEA/TBWA
Key facts
Recent developments
Clear Channel Ireland
Key facts
Recent developments
Irish International
Key facts
Recent developments
JCDecaux Ireland
Key facts
Recent developments
LyleBailie International
Key facts
Recent developments
MEC Ireland
Key facts
Recent developments
Ogilvy & Mather
Key facts
Recent developments
Omnicom Group
Key facts
Recent developments
Owens DDB
Key facts
Recent developments
Publicis Dublin
Key facts
Recent developments
Rothco
Key facts
Recent developments
WPP
Key facts
Recent developments

The Consumer – Effectiveness of Advertising

Key points
TV rated the most effective method of advertising
Figure 17: How effective consumers find different methods of advertising to be (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), NI and RoI, June 2015
NI men and RoI Boomers find TV advertising most effective
Figure 18: Consumers who rated TV advertising as ‘1’ (most effective), by gender and age, NI and RoI, June 2015
Sponsorship of TV shows effective at reaching Millennials and early Gen-Xers
Figure 19: Consumers who rated sponsorship of TV shows as ‘1’ (most effective), by gender and age, NI and RoI, June 2015
Billboards and outdoor posters effective in reaching city dwellers
Figure 20: How effective consumers rate billboards/outdoor posters as ‘1’ (most effective), by location, RoI, June 2015

The Consumer – Interaction with Advertising

Key points
Irish consumers agree that volume of advertising has increased
Figure 21: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, NI and RoI, June 2015
NI women most receptive to advertising with special offers
Figure 22: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by gender and age, NI, June 2015
Late Gen-Xers in RoI think there is more advertising today compared to five years ago
Figure 23: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by gender and age, RoI, June 2015
NI Millennials most likely to feel misled by advertising
Figure 24: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by gender and age, NI, June 2015
Figure 25: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by gender and age, RoI, June 2015

The Consumer – Attitudes towards Advertising

Key points
Consumers understand that advertising keeps some services free
Figure 26: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, NI and RoI, June 2015
Millennials most annoyed by in-app advertising
Figure 27: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by age, NI, June 2015
Figure 28: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by age, RoI, June 2015
Young consumers switching to other devices during TV ad breaks
Figure 29: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by gender and age, NI, June 2015
Figure 30: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by gender and age, RoI, June 2015
Young and old consumers prefer direct mail to be printed on recyclable materials
Figure 31: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by gender and age, NI, June 2015
Figure 32: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by gender and age, RoI, June 2015

Appendix

NI Toluna
Figure 33: How effective consumers rate TV advertising (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 34: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of TV shows (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 35: How effective consumers rate radio advertising (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 36: How effective consumers rate cinema advertising (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 37: How effective consumers rate newspaper/magazine advertising (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 38: How effective consumers rate advertising they receive in the mail (direct mail) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 39: How effective consumers rate smartphone/tablet in-app advertising (eg Candy Crush) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 40: How effective consumers rate advertising on a search engine (eg Google/Yahoo) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 41: How effective consumers rate display/banner advertisements on webpages (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 42: How effective consumers rate advertising on social network feeds (eg sponsored links on Facebook) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 43: How effective consumers rate ‘Liked’ advertisements on social networks (eg when a friend has liked a company post/page) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 44: How effective consumers rate billboards/outdoor posters (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 45: How effective consumers rate advertising on the side of buses/taxis (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 46: How effective consumers rate advertisements on internet media service (eg YouTube, Spotify) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 47: How effective consumers rate augmented reality/NFC points/QR codes (eg interactive bus stops) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 48: How effective consumers rate product placement (eg famous brands featured in a TV show/film) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 49: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 50: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by demographics, NI, June 2015 (continued)
Figure 51: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by demographics, NI, June 2015 (continued)
Figure 52: Agreement with the statement ‘Smartphone/tablet in-app adverts annoy me’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 53: Agreement with the statement ‘I change the channel/radio station/my browser tab when advertisements start’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 54: Agreement with the statement ‘I have had my name taken off mailing lists/databases’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 55: Agreement with the statement ‘I think I bought a product/service in the last 12 months after it was endorsed/reviewed by a blogger/vlogger that I follow’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 56: Agreement with the statement ‘I have been encouraged to buy products that have sponsored television programmes’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 57: Agreement with the statement ‘I find online advertising to be more ‘in your face’ than offline advertising (eg expanding video banners)’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 58: Agreement with the statement ‘Personalised advertising through the post is more likely to catch my attention than standard mail advertising’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 59: Agreement with the statement ‘I understand that advertising is essential to keep some services free to use (eg Google, Facebook)’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 60: Agreement with the statement ‘I prefer advertising sent through the post to be printed on recyclable materials’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 61: Agreement with the statement ‘I switch to using other devices when ad breaks start on TV (eg smartphone/tablet)’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 62: Agreement with the statement ‘I enjoy outdoor advertising that you can interact with using a smartphone/tablet (eg QR codes)’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
Figure 63: Agreement with the statement ‘I think it should be illegal to 'touch up' images in advertising (ie Photoshopping images in fashion advertisements)’, by demographics, NI, June 2015
RoI Toluna
Figure 64: How effective consumers rate TV advertising (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 65: How effective consumers rate sponsorship of TV shows (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 66: How effective consumers rate radio advertising (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 67: How effective consumers rate cinema advertising (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 68: How effective consumers rate newspaper/magazine advertising (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 69: How effective consumers rate advertising they receive in the mail (direct mail) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 70: How effective consumers rate smartphone/tablet in-app advertising (eg Candy Crush) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 71: How effective consumers rate advertising on a search engine (eg Google/Yahoo) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 72: How effective consumers rate display/banner advertisements on webpages (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 73: How effective consumers rate advertising on social network feeds (eg sponsored links on Facebook) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 74: How effective consumers rate ‘Liked’ advertisements on social networks (eg when a friend has liked a company post/page) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 75: How effective consumers rate billboards/outdoor posters (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 76: How effective consumers rate advertising on the side of buses/taxis (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 77: How effective consumers rate advertisements on internet media service (eg YouTube, Spotify) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 78: How effective consumers rate augmented reality/NFC points/QR codes (eg interactive bus stops) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 79: How effective consumers rate product placement (eg famous brands featured in a TV show/film) (1 being the most effective and 5 being the least effective), by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 80: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 81: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by demographics, RoI, June 2015 (continued)
Figure 82: Agreement with statements relating to advertising, by demographics, RoI, June 2015 (continued)
Figure 83: Agreement with the statement ‘Smartphone/tablet in-app adverts annoy me’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 84: Agreement with the statement ‘I change the channel/radio station/my browser tab when advertisements start’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 85: Agreement with the statement ‘I have had my name taken off mailing lists/databases’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 86: Agreement with the statement ‘I think I bought a product/service in the last 12 months after it was endorsed/reviewed by a blogger/vlogger that I follow’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 87: Agreement with the statement ‘I have been encouraged to buy products that have sponsored television programmes’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 88: Agreement with the statement ‘I find online advertising to be more ‘in your face’ than offline advertising (eg expanding video banners)’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 89: Agreement with the statement ‘Personalised advertising through the post is more likely to catch my attention than standard mail advertising’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 90: Agreement with the statement ‘I understand that advertising is essential to keep some services free to use (eg Google, Facebook)’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 91: Agreement with the statement ‘I prefer advertising sent through the post to be printed on recyclable materials’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 92: Agreement with the statement ‘I switch to using other devices when ad breaks start on TV (eg smartphone/tablet)’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 93: Agreement with the statement ‘I enjoy outdoor advertising that you can interact with using a smartphone/tablet (eg QR codes)’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015
Figure 94: Agreement with the statement ‘I think it should be illegal to 'touch up' images in advertising (ie Photoshopping images in fashion advertisements)’, by demographics, RoI, June 2015

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