Advertising: Mobile, TV and Internet - US - July 2016


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Mintel

$ 3996

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The advertising landscape is more complex than ever as consumers now relate to ads across television, online, and mobile platforms. Consumers can be influenced by marketing messages, but only if the message is received over the most strategic platform.

Table of Content

Overview

What you need to know
Definition

Executive Summary

The issues
Large segment of consumers unfazed by advertisements
Figure 1: Types of advertising that drives interest - none, by age group, May 2016
More-affluent consumers not interested, despite seeing more ads
Figure 2: Types of advertising that drive interest, by household income, May 2016
Many consumers view mobile ads negatively
Figure 3: Attitudes toward mobile ads, May 2016
The opportunities
Online ads can influence targeted markets, especially younger men
Figure 4: Attitudes toward mobile ads, by gender and age, May 2016
One quarter click on native ads to learn more
Figure 5: Native ads, by Hispanic origin, May 2016
When ads come on TV, nearly half of consumers stay tuned in
Figure 6: Response to TV ads, May 2016
What it means

The Market – What You Need to Know

Online advertising set to exceed TV advertising
Large segment of consumers unfazed by advertisements
Streaming gains popularity to some decline in pay TV

Market Size and Forecast

Total online advertising set to exceed television advertising
Figure 7: Total US mobile advertising revenues and fan chart forecast, at current prices, 2011-21
Figure 8: Total US online* advertising revenues and fan chart forecast, at current prices, 2011-21
Figure 9: Total US television advertising revenues and forecast, at current prices, 2011-21

Market Perspective

Large segment of consumers unfazed by advertisements
Figure 10: Types of advertising that drive interest - none, by age, May 2016

Market Factors

Streaming gains popularity to some decline in pay TV
Figure 11: US residential pay TV subscriptions, 2011-16
Broadband growth slows, potentially limiting access to large ads
Figure 12: US residential broadband subscriptions, 2012-15
Mobile phone growth slowing down
Figure 13: Total US volume sales and fan chart forecast for smartphones, 2010-20

Key Players – What You Need to Know

TV ads continue to have greatest impact
Ads in mobile games and apps yet to reach wide audience
TV advertisers adjusting to change with native content

What’s Working?

Good, old-fashioned TV ads reaching widest market
Figure 14: Types of advertising that drive interest, television ads, by select demographics, May 2016
TV ads tap into humor and heart for most effectiveness
Figure 15: Microsoft Ad, march 2016
Figure 16: Heinz Ad, January 2016
Figure 17: Apple Ad, March 2016

What’s Struggling?

Ads in mobile games and apps yet to reach wide audience
Figure 18: Types of advertising that drive interest, ad in mobile game and mobile app, by select demographics, May 2016

What’s Next?

TV advertisers adjusting to change with native content
Brands partner with providers to offer native content
Figure 19: Empire Music Video, “Good Enough,” April 2016

The Consumer – What You Need to Know

Television ads most commonly seen
Online ads can influence targeted markets, especially younger men
Viewers tolerant of 15 seconds or less before online ads
Many consumers view mobile ads negatively
One quarter click on native ads to learn more

Reach/Frequency of Ads

Television ads seen by all
Figure 20: Reach/frequency of advertising, any frequency and monthly, May 2016
Men seeing many ads daily
Figure 21: Reach/frequency of advertising - daily, by gender, May 2016
New media ads regularly seen by Millennials
Figure 22: Reach/frequency of advertising, at least monthly, by generation, May 2016
More-affluent consumers seeing more ads, but are they effective?
Figure 23: Reach/frequency of advertising, at least monthly, by household income, May 2016
New media ad channels reach Hispanics
Figure 24: Reach/frequency of advertising - monthly, by race/Hispanic origin, May 2016
In their words

Comparison in Driving Interest from Ads

Television ads driving most overall interest by far
Figure 25: Types of advertising that drive interest, May 2016
TV ads influence older adults, men 18-34 respond to online and social
Figure 26: Types of advertising that drive interest, by gender and age, May 2016
More affluent no more likely to be interested, despite seeing more ads
Figure 27: Types of advertising that drive interest, by household income, May 2016
Hispanics far more likely to be influenced by social media and video ads
Figure 28: Types of advertising that drive interest, by race/Hispanic origin, May 2016
In their words

Patience with Online Video Ads

Viewers tolerant of 15 seconds or less before online ads
Figure 29: Patience with online video ads, May 2016
Millennials and Baby Boomers more receptive to longer ads
Figure 30: Patience with online video ads, by generation, May 2016
Opportunity to reach parents with video ads
Figure 31: Patience with online video ads, by parental status of children in household, May 2016
Many Hispanics willing to watch ads for 15 seconds before video
Figure 32: Patience with online video ads, by Hispanic origin, May 2016
In their words

Attitudes toward Advertising

In their words

Attitudes toward Mobile Ads

Many consumers view mobile ads negatively
Figure 33: Attitudes toward mobile ads, May 2016
Men age 18-44 responding to mobile ads
Figure 34: Attitudes toward mobile ads, by gender and age, May 2016
After seeing mobile ads, parents four times as likely to buy
Figure 35: Attitudes toward mobile ads, by parental status of children in household, May 2016
Hispanics more likely to respond to mobile ads
Figure 36: Attitudes toward mobile ads, by Hispanic origin, May 2016

Attitudes toward Native Ads

One quarter click on native ads to learn more
Figure 37: Native ads, May 2016
Opportunity to reach men 18-44 with native ads
Figure 38: Native ads, by gender and age, May 2016
Oldest and youngest both try to ignore native ads
Figure 39: Native ads, by age, May 2016
More-affluent consumers using ad blockers
Figure 40: Native ads, by household income, May 2016
Hispanics sharing native ads with friends
Figure 41: Native ads, by Hispanic origin, May 2016
In their words

Response to TV ads

When ads come on TV, nearly half of consumers stay tuned in
Figure 42: Response to TV ads, May 2016
Majority of men under 44 watching TV ads
Figure 43: Response to TV ads – Watch the ad, by gender and age, May 2016
Younger audience watching TV while using other devices
Figure 44: Response to TV ads – Do activities on another device, by age, May 2016
Dads tuning-in to TV ads
Figure 45: Response to TV ads – Watch the ad, by parental status of children in the household, May 2016
Black consumers more likely to watch the ad
Figure 46: Response to TV ads, by race/Hispanic origin, May 2016

Appendix – Data Sources and Abbreviations

Data sources
Sales data
Fan chart forecast
Consumer survey data
Consumer qualitative research
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations
Terms

Appendix – Market

Figure 47: Total US mobile advertising revenues and forecast, at current prices, 2011-21
Figure 48: Total US mobile advertising revenues and forecast, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2011-21
Figure 49: Total US online* advertising revenues and forecast, at current prices, 2011-21
Figure 50: Total US online* advertising revenues and forecast, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2011-21
Figure 51: Total US television advertising revenues and forecast, at current prices, 2011-21
Figure 52: Total US television advertising revenues and forecast, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2011-21

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