The Private LTE Network Ecosystem: 2016 - 2030 - Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies, Industry Verticals & Forecasts


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370pages

Signals and Systems Telecom

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For years, the critical communications industry has relied on narrowband LMR (Land Mobile Radio) networks for mission-critical voice and basic data services. Due to the bandwidth limitations of these LMR networks, public safety agencies and other users within the critical communications industry have turned towards commercial LTE networks to support growing demands for mobile broadband services such as video transmission and bandwidth-intensive field applications.

However, most commercial LTE networks do not necessarily meet the priority, security, resilience and availability requirements of the critical communications industry. By providing authority over coverage and capacity, private LTE networks can alleviate these concerns while delivering guaranteed connectivity.

Expected to surpass $800 Million in global investments by the end of 2016, private LTE networks are increasingly becoming the preferred approach to deliver mobile broadband services in the critical communications industry. Fueled by large-scale rollouts in the public safety, energy and other sectors, the market is further expected to grow at a CAGR of 32% between 2016 and 2020.

The “Private LTE Network Ecosystem: 2016 – 2030 – Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies, Industry Verticals & Forecasts” report presents an in-depth assessment of the private LTE network ecosystem including technology, architectural components, operational models, key trends, market drivers, challenges, vertical market opportunities, applications, deployment case studies, spectrum allocation, standardization, regulatory landscape, future roadmap, value chain, ecosystem player profiles and strategies. The report also presents forecasts for private LTE network infrastructure investments from 2016 till 2030. The forecasts cover 3 submarkets, 5 vertical markets and 6 regions.

The report comes with an associated Excel datasheet suite covering quantitative data from all numeric forecasts presented in the report.

Topics Covered

The report covers the following topics:

  • Private LTE network ecosystem
  • Market drivers and barriers
  • Technology, architectural components and operational models
  • Analysis of vertical markets, applications and key trends
  • Case studies of 20 private LTE network deployments
  • Review of spectrum allocation for private LTE networks
  • Regulatory landscape and standardization
  • Industry roadmap and value chain
  • Profiles and strategies of 190 ecosystem players including LTE infrastructure OEMs and system integrators
  • Strategic recommendations for enterprises, LTE infrastructure OEMs, system integrators and mobile operators
  • Market analysis and forecasts from 2016 till 2030

Forecast Segmentation
Market forecasts are provided for each of the following submarkets and their subcategories:

Submarkets

  • RAN (Radio Access Network)
  • EPC (Evolved Packet Core) & Policy
  • Mobile Backhaul & Transport

Vertical Markets

  • Public Safety
  • Military
  • Energy & Utilities
  • Transportation
  • Others

Regional Markets

  • Asia Pacific
  • Eastern Europe
  • Middle East & Africa
  • Latin & Central America
  • North America
  • Western Europe

Key Questions Answered

The report provides answers to the following key questions:

  • How big is the private LTE network opportunity?
  • What trends, challenges and barriers are influencing its growth?
  • How is the ecosystem evolving by segment and region?
  • What will the market size be in 2020 and at what rate will it grow?
  • Which submarkets will see the highest percentage of growth?
  • How does standardization impact the adoption of LTE for critical communications?
  • When will MCPTT (Mission-Critical Push-to-Talk) and proximity services see large-scale proliferation?
  • What opportunities exist for commercial mobile operators in the private LTE network ecosystem?
  • Will LTE replace GSM-R and other legacy technologies for railway communications and applications?
  • Which spectrum band will be the most dominant choice for private LTE network deployments?
  • What are the prospects of rapidly deployable tactical LTE networks in the military and public safety sectors?
  • Who are the key market players and what are their strategies?
  • What strategies should system integrators and vendors adopt to remain competitive?

Key Findings

The report has the following key findings:

  • Expected to surpass $800 Million in global investments by the end of 2016, private LTE networks are increasingly becoming the preferred approach to deliver mobile broadband services in the critical communications industry. Fueled by large-scale rollouts in the public safety, energy and other sectors, the market is further expected to grow at a CAGR of 32% between 2016 and 2020.
  • By the end of 2020, the North America region will account for over 35% of all private LTE investments worldwide. However, largely driven by South Korea’s rollout plans for public safety, railway and maritime LTE networks, the Asia Pacific region will continue to retain a strong position in the market.
  • Several companies, such as TEN (Texas Energy Network) and INET (Infrastructure Networks) in the United States, have strategically deployed private LTE networks in remote, oil-rich areas, to exclusively provide mobile broadband services to energy companies.
  • To alleviate large-scale infrastructure investments, several European countries are pairing dedicated private mobile core platforms with commercial LTE networks to deliver prioritized mobile broadband services to public safety subscribers.
  • Conventional LMR industry players are leveraging partnerships with established LTE infrastructure OEMs such as Ericsson, Nokia, Huawei and Samsung, to offer end-to-end private LTE network solutions

Countires Covered

  • Afghanistan
  • Albania
  • Algeria
  • Andorra
  • Angola
  • Anguilla
  • Antigua & Barbuda
  • Argentina
  • Armenia
  • Aruba
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Bahamas
  • Bahrain
  • Bangladesh
  • Barbados
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Belize
  • Benin
  • Bermuda
  • Bhutan
  • Bolivia
  • Bosnia Herzegovina
  • Botswana
  • Brazil
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Brunei
  • Bulgaria
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cambodia
  • Cameroon
  • Canada
  • Cape Verde
  • Cayman Islands
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Chile
  • China
  • Cocos Islands
  • Colombia
  • Comoros Islands
  • Congo
  • Cook Islands
  • Costa Rica
  • Côte d'Ivoire
  • Croatia
  • Cuba
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Democratic Rep of Congo (ex-Zaire)
  • Denmark
  • Djibouti
  • Dominica
  • Dominican Republic
  • East Timor
  • Ecuador
  • Egypt
  • El Salvador
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Eritrea
  • Estonia
  • Ethiopia
  • Faroe Islands
  • Federated States of Micronesia
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • France
  • French Guiana
  • French Polynesia (ex-Tahiti)
  • French West Indies
  • Gabon
  • Gambia
  • Georgia
  • Germany
  • Ghana
  • Gibraltar
  • Greece
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • Guam
  • Guatemala
  • Guernsey
  • Guinea Republic
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • Honduras
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Ireland
  • Isle of Man
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Jamaica
  • Japan
  • Jersey
  • Jordan
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kenya
  • Kirghizstan
  • Kiribati
  • Korea
  • Kosovo
  • Kuwait
  • Laos
  • Latvia
  • Lebanon
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Macau
  • Macedonia
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Malaysia
  • Maldives
  • Mali
  • Malta
  • Marshall Islands
  • Mauritania
  • Mauritius
  • Mayotte
  • Mexico
  • Moldova
  • Monaco
  • Mongolia
  • Montenegro
  • Montserrat
  • Morocco
  • Mozambique
  • Myanmar
  • Namibia
  • Nepal
  • Netherlands
  • Netherlands Antilles
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Nicaragua
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • Niue
  • North Korea
  • Northern Marianas
  • Norway
  • Oman
  • Pakistan
  • Palau
  • Palestine
  • Panama
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Puerto Rico
  • Qatar
  • Réunion
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • Rwanda
  • Samoa
  • Samoa (American)
  • Sao Tomé & Principe
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Senegal
  • Serbia
  • Seychelles
  • Sierra Leone
  • Singapore
  • Slovak Republic
  • Slovenia
  • Solomon Islands
  • Somalia
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Sri Lanka
  • St Kitts & Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent & The Grenadines
  • Sudan
  • Suriname
  • Swaziland
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Syria
  • Tajikistan
  • Taiwan
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Togo
  • Tonga
  • Trinidad & Tobago
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • Turkmenistan
  • Turks & Caicos Islands
  • UAE
  • Uganda
  • UK
  • Ukraine
  • Uruguay
  • US Virgin Islands
  • USA
  • Uzbekistan
  • Vanuatu
  • Venezuela
  • Vietnam
  • Yemen
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

List of Companies Mentioned

  • 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project)
  • Abu Dhabi Police
  • Accelleran
  • Adax
  • ADCOM-911 (Adams County Communications Center)
  • Addis Ababa Light Rail
  • Advantech
  • Advantech Wireless
  • Affirmed Networks
  • Airbus Defence and Space
  • Airbus Group
  • Air-Lynx
  • Airspan Networks
  • Airwave
  • Alcatel-Lucent
  • Alstom
  • Altiostar Networks
  • Ambulance Victoria
  • Amdocs
  • Anritsu Corporation
  • Ansaldo STS
  • Arcadyan Technology Corporation
  • Argela
  • Aricent
  • ARItel
  • Arqiva
  • Artemis Networks
  • Aselsan
  • ASOCS
  • ASTRI (Hong Kong Applied Science and Technology Research Institute)
  • ASTRID
  • AT&T
  • Athena Wireless Communications
  • Athonet
  • Atlas Telecom
  • Avanti Communications Group
  • Aviat Networks
  • Axis Teknologies
  • Axxcelera Broadband Wireless (Moseley Associates)
  • Barrett Communications
  • Beach Energy
  • Bilbao Metro
  • Black Box Corporation
  • Blackned
  • Bombardier Transportation
  • Broadcom
  • Brocade Communications Systems
  • BT Group
  • BTI Wireless
  • Busan Transportation Corporation
  • CalAmp Corporation
  • Cavium
  • CCI (Communication Components Inc.)
  • CCI (Competitive Companies, Inc.)
  • Ceragon
  • Challenge Networks
  • China Southern Power Grid
  • Ciena Corporation
  • Cisco Systems
  • Cobham
  • Codan Radio Communications
  • Comba Telecom Systems Holdings
  • CommAgility
  • CommScope
  • Contela
  • Core Network Dynamics
  • Coriant
  • Corning
  • County of Los Angeles
  • Crown Castle
  • Cybertel Bridge
  • Cygnus Satellite
  • Dali Wireless
  • Datang Mobile
  • DeltaNode (Bird Technologies)
  • DNK (Norwegian Directorate for Emergency Communication)
  • Dongwon T&I
  • DragonWave
  • Dubai Police
  • EA Networks (Electricity Ashburton)
  • EchoStar Corporation
  • EE
  • Elbit Systems
  • Elta Systems
  • Ericsson
  • Esharah Etisalat Security Solutions
  • ETELM
  • Etherstack
  • Ethertronics
  • ETRI (Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, South Korea)
  • ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute)
  • EUAR (European Union Agency for Railways)
  • Exalt Communications
  • Exelis
  • EXFO
  • Expway
  • ExteNet Systems
  • Federated Wireless
  • FirstNet (First Responder Network Authority)
  • Fraunhofer Fokus
  • French Army
  • Fujitsu
  • Galtronics Corporation
  • Gemtek Technology Company
  • GENBAND
  • General Dynamics Corporation
  • General Dynamics Mission Systems
  • German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr)
  • Goodman Networks
  • Google
  • Grant County Sheriff's Department
  • GWT (Global Wireless Technologies)
  • Harris Corporation
  • Harris County
  • Hitachi
  • Home Office, UK
  • HPE (Hewlett Packard Enterprise)
  • Huawei
  • Hytera Communications Company
  • IAI (Israel Aerospace Industries)
  • INET (Infrastructure Networks)
  • InfoVista
  • Inmarsat
  • Intel Corporation
  • InterDigital
  • ip.access
  • Itelazpi
  • ITU (International Telecommunication Union)
  • JMA Wireless
  • JRC (Japan Radio Company)
  • Juni Global
  • Juniper Networks
  • JVCKENWOOD Corporation
  • Kapsch CarrierCom
  • Kathrein-Werke KG
  • Kenyan Police Service
  • Keysight Technologies
  • Kodiak Networks
  • Koning & Hartman
  • Korail (Korea Railroad)
  • Korea Rail Network Authority
  • KT Corporation
  • Kudelski Group
  • L-3 Communications Holdings
  • LA-RICS (Los Angeles Regional Interoperable Communications System)
  • Lemko Corporation
  • Leonardo-Finmeccanica
  • LG CNS
  • LGS Innovations
  • Ligado Networks
  • Lijiang Police
  • Lockheed Martin Corporation
  • Marlink
  • MER-CellO Wireless Solutions
  • Mitel Networks Corporation
  • Mitsubishi Electric Corporation
  • MOF (Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, South Korea)
  • MOLIT (Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, South Korea)
  • Motorola Solutions
  • MPS (Ministry of Public Security, China)
  • MPSS (Ministry of Public Safety and Security, South Korea)
  • MSB (Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency)
  • Mutualink
  • Nanjing Municipal Government
  • NEC Corporation
  • Nedaa
  • Nemergent
  • Netas
  • New Postcom Equipment Company
  • NI (National Instruments) Corporation
  • Nokia Networks
  • Northrop Grumman Corporation
  • NTT DoCoMo
  • Nutaq
  • O3b Networks
  • Oceus Networks
  • Octasic
  • Panda Electronics (Nanjing Panda Electronics Company)
  • Panorama Antennas
  • Parallel Wireless
  • Pepro
  • PetroChina
  • PMN (Private Mobile Networks)
  • Polaris Networks
  • Port of Tianjin
  • Potevio (China Potevio Company)
  • Public Wireless
  • Qatar MOI (Ministry of Interior)
  • Qualcomm
  • Quanta Computer
  • Qucell
  • Queensland Police Service
  • Quortus
  • Radisys Corporation
  • Raytheon Company
  • Redline Communications
  • RFS (Radio Frequency Systems)
  • Rio Tinto Group
  • Rivada Networks
  • Rohill
  • Royal Dutch Shell
  • Safaricom
  • Samji Electronics Company
  • Samsung Electronics
  • Selex
  • Sepura
  • SerComm Corporation
  • SES
  • Shanghai Police Department
  • Shuohuang Railway
  • Siemens
  • Sierra Wireless
  • Siklu
  • Simoco
  • SiRRAN
  • SK Telecom
  • SK Telesys
  • SLA Corporation
  • SLC (Secure Land Communications)
  • SOLiD (SOLiD Technologies)
  • Sonim Technologies
  • Southern Company
  • SouthernLINC Wireless
  • Space Data
  • Spectra Group
  • SpiderCloud Wireless
  • Spirent Communications
  • Star Solutions
  • State of New Jersey
  • State of New Mexico
  • State of Texas
  • State Security Networks Group, Finland
  • Statoil
  • Sunnada (Fujian Sunnada Communication Company)
  • Tait Communications
  • Tampnet
  • Taqua
  • TCCA (TETRA and Critical Communications Association)
  • TCL Communication
  • Tecom
  • Tecore
  • TEKTELIC Communications
  • Telefónica
  • Telenor Maritime
  • Telrad Networks
  • Telstra
  • Teltronic
  • Telum
  • TEN (Texas Energy Network)
  • Thales
  • TI (Texas Instruments)
  • Tropico
  • TrustComm
  • TTA (Telecommunications Technology Association, South Korea)
  • TxDPS (Texas Department of Public Safety)
  • U.S. Department of Commerce
  • U.S. FCC (Federal Communications Commission)
  • U.S. Navy
  • U.S. NPSTC (National Public Safety Telecommunications Council)
  • UANGEL
  • UIC (International Union of Railways)
  • URSYS
  • Utility Associates
  • Verizon Communications
  • ViaSat
  • Viavi Solutions
  • Vientiane Municipal Police
  • VIRVE
  • Vodafone
  • Weijiamao Coal Mine
  • WNC (Wistron NeWeb Corporation)
  • xG Technology
  • Z-Com (ZDC Wireless)
  • Zetel Solutions
  • Zhengzhou Metro
  • Zinwave
  • ZTE

Table of Contents

1 Chapter 1: Introduction 18
1.1 Executive Summary 18
1.2 Topics Covered 20
1.3 Forecast Segmentation 21
1.4 Key Questions Answered 22
1.5 Key Findings 23
1.6 Methodology 24
1.7 Target Audience 25
1.8 Companies & Organizations Mentioned 26

2 Chapter 2: An Overview of Private LTE Networks 30
2.1 Private Mobile Radio Networks 30
2.1.1 Addressing the Needs of the Critical Communications Industry 30
2.1.2 Evolution from Analog to Digital LMR (Land Mobile Radio) Networks 30
2.1.3 The Limitations of LMR Networks 31
2.1.4 Moving Towards Commercial Mobile Broadband Technologies 32
2.2 LTE for Private Mobile Broadband 33
2.2.1 Why LTE? 33
2.2.2 Performance Metrics 33
2.2.3 Coexistence, Interoperability and Spectrum Flexibility 34
2.2.4 A Thriving Ecosystem 34
2.2.5 Economic Feasibility 35
2.3 Architectural Components of Private LTE Networks 36
2.3.1 UE (User Equipment) 36
2.3.2 E-UTRAN – The LTE RAN (Radio Access Network) 37
2.3.2.1 eNB Base Station 37
2.3.3 EPC (Evolved Packet Core) – The LTE Mobile Core 38
2.3.3.1 SGW (Serving Gateway) 38
2.3.3.2 PGW (Packet Data Gateway) 38
2.3.3.3 MME (Mobility Management Entity) 39
2.3.3.4 HSS (Home Subscriber Server) 39
2.3.3.5 PCRF (Policy Charging and Rules Function) 39
2.3.4 IMS (IP-Multimedia Subsystem), Application & Service Elements 40
2.3.4.1 IMS Core & VoLTE 40
2.3.4.2 MBMS (Multimedia Broadcast Multicast Service) 40
2.3.4.3 ProSe (Proximity Services) 41
2.3.4.4 Group Communication 41
2.3.5 Gateways for LTE-LMR Interworking 42
2.3.6 Transport Network 42
2.4 Private LTE Network Operational Models 43
2.4.1 Independent Private LTE Network 43
2.4.2 Managed Private LTE Network 44
2.4.3 Commercial LTE Network with Private Mobile Core 45
2.4.4 Other Approaches 46
2.5 Key Applications of Private LTE Networks 47
2.5.1 Video & High-Resolution Imagery Transmission 47
2.5.2 Secure & Seamless Mobile Broadband Access 48
2.5.3 Situational Awareness & Enhanced CAD (Computer Aided Dispatching) 48
2.5.4 HD Voice & Group Communications 49
2.5.5 Bandwidth-Intensive Field Applications 49
2.5.6 PIS (Passenger Information System) 50
2.5.7 Delay-Sensitive Control of Transport Infrastructure 50
2.5.8 Location Services & Mapping 50
2.5.9 Telemetry, Control & Remote Diagnostics 51
2.6 Market Growth Drivers 52
2.6.1 Recognition of LTE as the De-Facto Mobile Broadband Standard 52
2.6.2 Endorsement from the Critical Communications Industry 53
2.6.3 Growing Demands for High-Speed Data Applications 54
2.6.4 Economic Feasibility 54
2.6.5 Spectral Efficiency & Flexible Bandwidth 54
2.6.6 Lack of Commercial Mobile Network Coverage in Remote Areas 55
2.6.7 QoS (Quality of Service) & Priority Provisioning 55
2.6.8 Regional Interoperability 56
2.7 Market Barriers 57
2.7.1 Lack of Dedicated Spectrum 57
2.7.2 Smaller Coverage Footprint than Legacy Private Mobile Networks 57
2.7.3 Funding Challenges 58
2.7.4 Issues with Standardization 58

3 Chapter 3: Key Vertical Markets & Case Studies 60
3.1 Vertical Markets 60
3.1.1 Public Safety 60
3.1.2 Military 61
3.1.3 Energy & Utilities 62
3.1.4 Transportation 63
3.1.5 Other Verticals 64
3.2 Private LTE Network Case Studies 65
3.2.1 Abu Dhabi Police 65
3.2.2 Beach Energy 66
3.2.3 Bilbao Metro 68
3.2.4 Busan Transportation Corporation 69
3.2.5 China Southern Power Grid 70
3.2.6 French Army 71
3.2.7 German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) 72
3.2.8 Harris County 73
3.2.9 INET (Infrastructure Networks) 74
3.2.10 Kenyan Police Service 75
3.2.11 LA-RICS (Los Angeles Regional Interoperable Communications System) 77
3.2.12 Lijiang Police 78
3.2.13 Nedaa 79
3.2.14 Qatar MOI (Ministry of Interior) 80
3.2.15 Rio Tinto Group 81
3.2.16 Shanghai Police Department 82
3.2.17 South Korea’s National Disaster Safety Communications Network 83
3.2.18 TEN (Texas Energy Network) 85
3.2.19 U.S. Navy 86
3.2.20 Zhengzhou Metro 88
3.2.21 Other Engagements 89

4 Chapter 4: Spectrum Allocation, Standardization & Regulatory Initiatives 91
4.1 Spectrum Allocation for Private LTE Networks 91
4.1.1 Asia Pacific 91
4.1.2 Europe 92
4.1.3 Middle East & Africa 93
4.1.4 North America 94
4.1.5 Latin & Central America 95
4.2 Standardization & Regulatory Initiatives 96
4.2.1 NPSTC (National Public Safety Telecommunications Council) 96
4.2.2 TCCA (TETRA and Critical Communications Association) 96
4.2.3 ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute) 97
4.2.4 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project) 97
4.2.4.1 MCPTT (Mission-Critical Push-to-Talk) for Voice, Video & Data 98
4.2.4.2 GCSE (Group Communication System Enablers) 99
4.2.4.3 GROUPE (Group Based Enhancements) 99
4.2.4.4 D2D Communication & ProSe (Proximity Services) 99
4.2.4.5 Resilience & IOPS (Isolated E-UTRAN Operation for Public Safety) 100
4.2.4.6 Higher Power User Terminals 101
4.2.5 TTA (Telecommunications Technology Association, South Korea) 102
4.2.5.1 PS-LTE (Public Safety LTE) 102
4.2.5.2 LTE-R (LTE Based Railway Communication System) 102
4.2.5.3 LTE-M (LTE-Maritime) 102
4.2.6 UIC (International Union of Railways) 103
4.2.6.1 Replacing GSM-R with LTE 103
4.2.6.2 FRMCS (Future Railway Mobile Communication System) Initiative 103
4.2.7 EUAR (European Union Agency for Railways) 104
4.2.7.1 Coordinating Efforts for FRMCS 104

5 Chapter 5: Industry Roadmap & Value Chain 105
5.1 Industry Roadmap 105
5.1.1 2016 – 2020: Large-Scale Investments in the Public Safety & Energy Sectors 105
5.1.2 2020 – 2025: Moving Towards LTE Based Railway Communications 106
5.1.3 2025 – 2030: Continued Investments with 5G Network Rollouts 107
5.2 Value Chain 108
5.2.1 Enabling Technology Providers 109
5.2.2 RAN, Mobile Core & Transport Infrastructure OEMs 109
5.2.3 Device OEMs 109
5.2.4 System Integrators 110
5.2.5 Application Developers 110
5.2.6 Test, Measurement & Performance Specialists 110
5.2.7 Mobile Operators 111
5.2.8 MVNOs 111
5.2.9 Vertical Market End Users 111

6 Chapter 6: Key Market Players 112
6.1 Accelleran 112
6.2 Adax 113
6.3 Advantech 114
6.4 Advantech Wireless 115
6.5 Affirmed Networks 116
6.6 Airbus Defence and Space 117
6.7 Air-Lynx 119
6.8 Airspan Networks 120
6.9 Alstom 121
6.10 Altiostar Networks 122
6.11 Amdocs 123
6.12 Anritsu Corporation 124
6.13 Ansaldo STS 125
6.14 Arcadyan Technology Corporation 126
6.15 Argela 127
6.16 Aricent 128
6.17 ARItel 129
6.18 Arqiva 130
6.19 Artemis Networks 131
6.20 Aselsan 132
6.21 ASOCS 133
6.22 ASTRI (Hong Kong Applied Science and Technology Research Institute) 134
6.23 AT&T 135
6.24 Athena Wireless Communications 136
6.25 Athonet 137
6.26 Avanti Communications Group 138
6.27 Aviat Networks 139
6.28 Axis Teknologies 140
6.29 Axxcelera Broadband Wireless (Moseley Associates) 141
6.30 Barrett Communications 142
6.31 Black Box Corporation 143
6.32 Blackned 144
6.33 Bombardier Transportation 145
6.34 Broadcom 146
6.35 Brocade Communications Systems 147
6.36 BTI Wireless 148
6.37 CalAmp Corporation 149
6.38 Cavium 150
6.39 CCI (Communication Components Inc.) 151
6.40 CCI (Competitive Companies, Inc.) 152
6.41 Crown Castle 153
6.42 Ceragon 154
6.43 Challenge Networks 155
6.44 Ciena Corporation 156
6.45 Cisco Systems 157
6.46 Cobham 158
6.47 Codan Radio Communications 160
6.48 Comba Telecom Systems Holdings 161
6.49 CommAgility 162
6.50 CommScope 163
6.51 Contela 164
6.52 Core Network Dynamics 165
6.53 Coriant 166
6.54 Corning 167
6.55 Cybertel Bridge 168
6.56 Dali Wireless 169
6.57 Datang Mobile 170
6.58 DeltaNode (Bird Technologies) 171
6.59 Dongwon T&I 172
6.60 DragonWave 173
6.61 EchoStar Corporation 174
6.62 EE 175
6.63 Elbit Systems 176
6.64 Ericsson 177
6.65 ETELM 178
6.66 Etherstack 179
6.67 Ethertronics 180
6.68 Exalt Communications 181
6.69 EXFO 182
6.70 Expway 183
6.71 ExteNet Systems 184
6.72 Federated Wireless 185
6.73 Fujitsu 186
6.74 Galtronics Corporation 187
6.75 Gemtek Technology Company 188
6.76 GENBAND 189
6.77 General Dynamics Mission Systems 190
6.78 Goodman Networks 191
6.79 GWT (Global Wireless Technologies) 192
6.80 Harris Corporation 193
6.81 Hitachi 194
6.82 HPE (Hewlett Packard Enterprise) 196
6.83 Huawei 197
6.84 Hytera Communications Company 199
6.85 IAI (Israel Aerospace Industries) 200
6.86 InfoVista 201
6.87 Inmarsat 202
6.88 Intel Corporation 203
6.89 InterDigital 204
6.90 ip.access 205
6.91 JMA Wireless 206
6.92 JRC (Japan Radio Company) 207
6.93 Juni Global 208
6.94 Juniper Networks 209
6.95 JVCKENWOOD Corporation 210
6.96 Kapsch CarrierCom 211
6.97 Kathrein-Werke KG 212
6.98 Keysight Technologies 213
6.99 Kodiak Networks 214
6.100 Koning & Hartman 215
6.101 KT Corporation 216
6.102 Kudelski Group 217
6.103 L-3 Communications Holdings 218
6.104 Lemko Corporation 219
6.105 Leonardo-Finmeccanica 220
6.106 LGS Innovations 221
6.107 Ligado Networks 222
6.108 Lockheed Martin Corporation 223
6.109 Marlink 224
6.110 MER-CellO Wireless Solutions 225
6.111 Mitel Networks Corporation 226
6.112 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation 227
6.113 Motorola Solutions 228
6.114 Mutualink 230
6.115 NEC Corporation 231
6.116 Nemergent 232
6.117 Netas 233
6.118 New Postcom Equipment Company 234
6.119 NI (National Instruments) Corporation 235
6.120 Nokia Networks 236
6.121 Northrop Grumman Corporation 238
6.122 Nutaq 239
6.123 Oceus Networks 240
6.124 Octasic 241
6.125 Panda Electronics (Nanjing Panda Electronics Company) 242
6.126 Panorama Antennas 243
6.127 Parallel Wireless 244
6.128 Pepro 245
6.129 PMN (Private Mobile Networks) 246
6.130 Polaris Networks 247
6.131 Potevio (China Potevio Company) 248
6.132 Public Wireless 249
6.133 Qualcomm 250
6.134 Quanta Computer 251
6.135 Qucell 252
6.136 Quortus 253
6.137 Radisys Corporation 254
6.138 Raytheon Company 255
6.139 Redline Communications 256
6.140 RFS (Radio Frequency Systems) 257
6.141 Rivada Networks 258
6.142 Rohill 259
6.143 Samji Electronics Company 260
6.144 Samsung Electronics 261
6.145 Sepura 263
6.146 SerComm Corporation 265
6.147 SES 266
6.148 Siemens 267
6.149 Sierra Wireless 268
6.150 Siklu 269
6.151 Simoco 270
6.152 SiRRAN 271
6.153 SK Telecom 272
6.154 SK Telesys 273
6.155 SLA Corporation 274
6.156 SOLiD (SOLiD Technologies) 275
6.157 Sonim Technologies 276
6.158 Space Data 277
6.159 Spectra Group 278
6.160 SpiderCloud Wireless 279
6.161 Spirent Communications 280
6.162 Star Solutions 281
6.163 Sunnada (Fujian Sunnada Communication Company) 282
6.164 Tait Communications 283
6.165 Tampnet 284
6.166 Taqua 285
6.167 TCL Communication 286
6.168 Tecom 287
6.169 Tecore 288
6.170 TEKTELIC Communications 289
6.171 Telefónica 290
6.172 Telenor Maritime 291
6.173 Telrad Networks 292
6.174 Telstra 293
6.175 Telum 294
6.176 Thales 295
6.177 TI (Texas Instruments) 297
6.178 Tropico 298
6.179 UANGEL 299
6.180 URSYS 300
6.181 Utility Associates 301
6.182 Verizon Communications 302
6.183 ViaSat 303
6.184 Viavi Solutions 304
6.185 WNC (Wistron NeWeb Corporation) 305
6.186 xG Technology 306
6.187 Zetel Solutions 307
6.188 Z-Com (ZDC Wireless) 308
6.189 Zinwave 309
6.190 ZTE 310

7 Chapter 7: Market Analysis & Forecasts 311
7.1 Global Outlook of Private LTE Network Investments 311
7.2 Segmentation by Submarket 312
7.2.1 RAN 312
7.2.2 EPC & Policy 313
7.2.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 314
7.3 Segmentation by Vertical Market 314
7.3.1 Public Safety 315
7.3.1.1 RAN 316
7.3.1.2 EPC & Policy 317
7.3.1.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 317
7.3.2 Military 318
7.3.2.1 RAN 319
7.3.2.2 EPC & Policy 320
7.3.2.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 320
7.3.3 Energy & Utilities 321
7.3.3.1 RAN 322
7.3.3.2 EPC & Policy 323
7.3.3.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 323
7.3.4 Transportation 324
7.3.4.1 RAN 325
7.3.4.2 EPC & Policy 326
7.3.4.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 326
7.3.5 Other Verticals 327
7.3.5.1 RAN 328
7.3.5.2 EPC & Policy 329
7.3.5.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 329
7.4 Segmentation by Region 330
7.4.1 RAN 330
7.4.2 EPC & Policy 331
7.4.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 332
7.5 Asia Pacific 333
7.5.1 RAN 333
7.5.2 EPC & Policy 334
7.5.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 335
7.6 Eastern Europe 336
7.6.1 RAN 336
7.6.2 EPC & Policy 337
7.6.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 338
7.7 Latin & Central America 339
7.7.1 RAN 339
7.7.2 EPC & Policy 340
7.7.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 341
7.8 Middle East & Africa 342
7.8.1 RAN 342
7.8.2 EPC & Policy 343
7.8.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 344
7.9 North America 345
7.9.1 RAN 345
7.9.2 EPC & Policy 346
7.9.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 347
7.10 Western Europe 348
7.10.1 RAN 348
7.10.2 EPC & Policy 349
7.10.3 Mobile Backhaul & Transport 350

8 Chapter 8: Conclusion & Strategic Recommendations 351
8.1 Why is the Market Poised to Grow? 351
8.2 Competitive Industry Landscape: Acquisitions, Alliances & Consolidation 351
8.3 Which Spectrum Bands will Dominate the Market? 352
8.3.1 700/800/900 MHz 352
8.3.2 400 MHz 353
8.3.3 Higher Frequencies 354
8.4 Monetizing Unused Spectrum 354
8.5 Opening the Door for Mission-Critical IoT (Internet of Things) Services 354
8.6 The Race for 5G: Implications for Private Mobile Networks 355
8.7 MVNO Arrangements for Critical Communications: Opportunities for EPC Investments 356
8.8 Opportunities for Commercial Mobile Operators 357
8.8.1 Operator Managed Private LTE Networks 357
8.8.2 Spectrum Leasing 358
8.8.3 RAN Sharing: Using Dedicated Spectrum over Commercial LTE Networks 358
8.9 Geographic Outlook: Which Regions Offer the Highest Growth Potential? 359
8.10 Which Vertical Sector will Lead the Market? 360
8.11 3GPP MCPTT (Mission-Critical Push-to-Talk): Timelines for Standardization & Commercial Availability 361
8.12 Will LTE Replace GSM-R for Railway Communications? 362
8.12.1 Early Investments in Asia Pacific 362
8.12.2 Future Prospects 363
8.12.3 Timeline for Replacing GSM-R Networks 363
8.13 Rapidly Deployable Tactical Networks for the Public Safety & Military Sectors 363
8.13.1 VNS (Vehicle Network System) 364
8.13.2 Tactical SOW (System-On-Wheels) 365
8.13.3 Tactical NIB (Network-in-a-Box) 365
8.13.4 Airborne Platforms 367
8.14 Strategic Recommendations 368
8.14.1 Enterprises 368
8.14.2 LTE Infrastructure OEMs 368
8.14.3 System Integrators 369
8.14.4 Commercial & Private Mobile Operators 369

NA

Figure 1: Basic Components of a Digital LMR Network 31
Figure 2: LTE Speed Compared to 3G & Wi-Fi Networks (Mbps) 35
Figure 3: Private LTE Network Architecture 37
Figure 4: Independent Private LTE Network 44
Figure 5: Managed Private LTE Network 45
Figure 6: Commercial LTE Network with a Private Mobile Core 46
Figure 7: Global LTE Subscriptions: 2016 – 2030 (Millions) 54
Figure 8: Military LTE Network Architecture 62
Figure 9: LTE ProSe Examples 101
Figure 10: Private LTE Network Industry Roadmap 106
Figure 11: Private LTE Network Value Chain 109
Figure 12: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 312
Figure 13: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue by Submarket: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 313
Figure 14: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments: 2016 – 2030 313
Figure 15: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 314
Figure 16: Global Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 314
Figure 17: Global Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 315
Figure 18: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue by Vertical: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 315
Figure 19: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in the Public Safety Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 316
Figure 20: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in the Public Safety Sector by Submarket: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 316
Figure 21: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments in the Public Safety Sector: 2016 – 2030 317
Figure 22: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue in the Public Safety Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 317
Figure 23: Global Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue in the Public Safety Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 318
Figure 24: Global Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue in the Public Safety Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 318
Figure 25: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in the Military Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 319
Figure 26: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in the Military Sector by Submarket: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 319
Figure 27: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments in the Military Sector: 2016 – 2030 320
Figure 28: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue in the Military Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 320
Figure 29: Global Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue in the Military Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 321
Figure 30: Global Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue in the Military Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 321
Figure 31: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in the Energy & Utilities Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 322
Figure 32: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in the Energy & Utilities Sector by Submarket: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 322
Figure 33: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments in the Energy & Utilities Sector: 2016 – 2030 323
Figure 34: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue in the Energy & Utilities Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 323
Figure 35: Global Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue in the Energy & Utilities Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 324
Figure 36: Global Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue in the Energy & Utilities Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 324
Figure 37: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in the Transportation Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 325
Figure 38: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in the Transportation Sector by Submarket: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 325
Figure 39: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments in the Transportation Sector: 2016 – 2030 326
Figure 40: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue in the Transportation Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 326
Figure 41: Global Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue in the Transportation Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 327
Figure 42: Global Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue in the Transportation Sector: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 327
Figure 43: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in Other Sectors: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 328
Figure 44: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue in Other Sectors by Submarket: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 328
Figure 45: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments in Other Sectors: 2016 – 2030 329
Figure 46: Global Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue in Other Sectors: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 329
Figure 47: Global Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue in Other Sectors: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 330
Figure 48: Global Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue in Other Sectors: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 330
Figure 49: Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue by Region: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 331
Figure 50: Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments by Region: 2016 – 2030 331
Figure 51: Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue by Region: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 332
Figure 52: Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue by Region: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 332
Figure 53: Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue by Region: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 333
Figure 54: Asia Pacific Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 334
Figure 55: Asia Pacific Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments: 2016 – 2030 334
Figure 56: Asia Pacific Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 335
Figure 57: Asia Pacific Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 335
Figure 58: Asia Pacific Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 336
Figure 59: Eastern Europe Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 337
Figure 60: Eastern Europe Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments: 2016 – 2030 337
Figure 61: Eastern Europe Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 338
Figure 62: Eastern Europe Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 338
Figure 63: Eastern Europe Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 339
Figure 64: Latin & Central America Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 340
Figure 65: Latin & Central America Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments: 2016 – 2030 340
Figure 66: Latin & Central America Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 341
Figure 67: Latin & Central America Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 341
Figure 68: Latin & Central America Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 342
Figure 69: Middle East & Africa Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 343
Figure 70: Middle East & Africa Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments: 2016 – 2030 343
Figure 71: Middle East & Africa Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 344
Figure 72: Middle East & Africa Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 344
Figure 73: Middle East & Africa Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 345
Figure 74: North America Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 346
Figure 75: North America Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments: 2016 – 2030 346
Figure 76: North America Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 347
Figure 77: North America Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 347
Figure 78: North America Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 348
Figure 79: Western Europe Private LTE Network Infrastructure Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 349
Figure 80: Western Europe Private LTE eNB Unit Shipments: 2016 – 2030 349
Figure 81: Western Europe Private LTE eNB Unit Shipment Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 350
Figure 82: Western Europe Private LTE EPC & Policy Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 350
Figure 83: Western Europe Private LTE Mobile Backhaul & Transport Network Revenue: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 351
Figure 84: Global EPC Investments in Critical Communications MVNO Networks: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 357
Figure 85: Global Private LTE Network Infrastructure Spending Breakdown by Vertical: 2016 (%) 361
Figure 86: Global Private LTE Network Investments in Railway Communications: 2016 – 2030 ($ Million) 363
Figure 87: Global Public Safety & Military LTE VNS (Vehicle Network System) eNB Installed Base: 2016 – 2030 365
Figure 88: Global Public Safety & Military LTE SOW (System-on-Wheels) eNB Installed Base: 2016 – 2030 366
Figure 89: Global Public Safety & Military LTE NIB (Network-in-a-Box) eNB Installed Base: 2016 – 2030 367
Figure 90: Global Public Safety & Military LTE Airborne eNB Platform Installed Base: 2016 – 2030 368